Yellowfin

Steve Rodger's New 2018 Yellowfin 36 Rigged With Dual 350 Mercury Verados, Simrad, Seadek

Steve Rodger's New 2018 Yellowfin 36 Rigged With Dual 350 Mercury Verados, Simrad, Seadek

There are some key features that I wanted on my boat:

  1. I wanted twin Mercury Verado motors. A lot of people are used to having 3 motors on a 36 due to having to cover a lot of millage for offshore fishing. There is plenty of power and strength with 2 motors, and in the Keys I don’t have to run as far to get to the fish. This is why I chose to go with 2 350 Verados rather than 3.

  2. This boat is built with 3 live wells, we have a back transom well that is very easy to open the latch to grab a few baits where you don’t have to lean over to get them out. The other well is a floor well. The reason we like this is because when we throw the net we can easily transfer the bait into the floor well. Lastly we have the leaning-post-well which we use mostly as a drink cooler but it can be filled easily.

  3. I updated with all the new Simrad NSS Ev 3. I couldn’t be happier with all of the Simrad functions and abilities it has to put us on the fish. This technology is by far the best Simrad product to date…

Photog Blog- By Jason Stemple

Red, White and Blue Show

sunrise at the marina, looks like a good start to the day. nikon d800, 16mm, f/4.0, 1/30 sec

sunrise at the marina, looks like a good start to the day. nikon d800, 16mm, f/4.0, 1/30 sec

fire in the sky. nikon d300s, 70mm, f/4.0, 1/80 sec

fire in the sky. nikon d300s, 70mm, f/4.0, 1/80 sec

The day we shot the Red, White and Blue show was probably my favorite day of the trip. We arrived at the marina and loaded gear into the two boats while an amazing sunset exploded the sky with color. As we rolled out into the channels that led us to the Mississippi it became clear that this would be by far, the calmest day we had seen. We stopped on our way out to cast net some mullet, then headed out a little ways to Sabiki up some blue runners as well. I was on the fishing boat from the start, so was able to shoot some good bait catching shots and some other detail stuff that I hadn’t been able to do from the camera boat. 

a nice run out the mississippi. nikon d800, 16mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec

a nice run out the mississippi. nikon d800, 16mm, f/5.6, 1/800 sec

The little sharks were quick to join the blue runner party, so as Scott and Steve loaded up the livewells, I shot some underwater of the little bait stealers. I use a GoPro on a long extendable pole for this kind of shot, it allows me to stay dry and to switch quickly back and forth between underwater and regular photography. The little sharks were fired up after eating a couple of runners, and would come right up to investigate the GoPro with mouths open. I had to dodge the teeth and bump them a few times, but got some fun shots. In about 20 minutes, we were full of bait and settled in for another half hour run out to a deep rig that Captain Billy Wells hoped was holding tuna.

Quickly after arrival at the rig, we saw tuna busting the surface, so they tossed out a few freebies and dropped back a couple of baits and quickly came tight. Scott made quick work of a little Yellowfin, which Steve handled and released. Scott dropped another bait back and a few minutes later called out “white marlin”. He had just seen a quick glimpse of a rounded dorsal working his bait and blurted it out. He came off the declaration a bit as he talked through what he had seen, “could have been a shark…” But he was determined to find out, a moment later he felt the bite, and dropped the bait back so that the fish could eat. Then he reeled down on it, setting the circle hook, the line came tight and the rod bent under the pressure, but there was no jump. Probably just a shark we all thought. But Walker had just come from a summer of amazing white marlin fishing in Maryland, so certainly nobody would want to call his instincts into question. A moment later it launched proving his call correct, and then kept jumping putting on a great aerial display. 

Scott loves white marlin almost as much as sailfish, so hooking this fish 1200 miles from where he was catching them a couple of days earlier was awesome.  The fight lasted about 25 minutes and when they pulled the fish along boatside, they realized that it was about a 100lb fish, which could have won a lot of money at the tournaments that Scott had been fishing back in Maryland. After a nice release we circled back around to the original position a little ways off the rig. 

Now it was Steve’s turn. In the next half hour or so, they caught a few little tuna and worked through some sharks then Steve got a big bite. It became apparent quickly that he was locked into a pretty big yellowfin and that this might take a little while. After about a half hour, he got it to the surface, but with a cameraman in the water and the camera boat coming over for a shot, each time it came up, it would sound again. I was able to use the extended battle to my advantage to get some underwater shots of the tuna and a hammerhead that was investigating the activity. Eventually they brought the tuna on board and again we circled back to deploy more baits. 

blue marlin launching. nikon d300s, 150mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

blue marlin launching. nikon d300s, 150mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

another blue jump. nikon d300s, 200mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

another blue jump. nikon d300s, 200mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

This time they dropped back a little tuna with the other baits to see if there were any bigger marlin around, and it turns out there were. A half-hour after catching the tuna, Steve’s marlin bait got hit hard, and a big blue marlin went airborne. Next, it did a series of jumps right past the rig before circling back around us. The fight went on for about 10 minutes before the big fish broke off, leaving us in silence. Despite losing the big blue, it had been a great day. They went on to catch a few more little tuna before a nice relatively smooth ride back to the docks.

blue marlin tailwalking past the rig before breaking off. nikon d300s, 70mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

blue marlin tailwalking past the rig before breaking off. nikon d300s, 70mm, f/4.5, 1/5000 sec

Photog Blog- Yellowfin Shows

The Yellowfin Tuna Shows

We came to Louisiana to sample the variety of offshore fishing available in the Northern Gulf, but #1 on our list was Yellowfin Tuna. The tuna fishery is strong and relatively reliable there, and we were fishing with the Mexican Gulf Fishing Company who have them pretty well dialed in. The winds had been blowing 20-30 for a bunch of days, so nobody had been out on the hunt, and this was the first day that it had laid down a little, so we were excited to get out after them. We met up at the marina at dawn and loaded a bunch of fishing gear into the Yellowfin 39 and a bunch of camera gear and crew into Captain Billy Wells’ boat and idled out. We came on plane in one of the many channels through the marsh and headed out towards the Gulf, passing by shrimpers, commercial fishermen and giant container ships on the way. 

sunrise at the marina. nikon d800, 35mm, f/ 4.0, 1/2500 sec

sunrise at the marina. nikon d800, 35mm, f/ 4.0, 1/2500 sec

Out in the Gulf we ran out about 10 miles passing a few rigs on the way stopping at another to load up on bait. As we pulled up there were giant schools of blue runners just off the rigs pushing some sort of smaller bait to the surface where thousands of terns were dancing on the surface picking off the easy meal. It was an amazing sight to see. I guess these blue runners weren’t the right size for tuna, so Captain Wells set up the Yellowfin right up against the rig and Scott and Steve dropped sabiki rigs back pulling up doubles triples and occasionally a full pull of bait, filling up the livewell in a half hour or so. After shooting this for a little bit, I tried to get some underwater shots of the blue runners, with varied success. They were fast and wary of the boat, so my best shots came from casting a GoPro on a float rig that I built into the school and hoping for the best.

Once loaded with bait, we set up to make a run out to a rig in deeper water that Billy thought could be holding tuna. The wind had laid down a lot but it certainly wasn’t slicked out, so the 45 minute ride was still pretty bumpy and the forecast was for the winds to ramp back up in the afternoon. Eventually, we arrived at a rig way out in a couple thousand feet of water and we began pulling out the camera and fishing gear. Steve and Scott threw out some live chum and dropped a couple baits back while Billy got on the radio and talked with one of his friends who had been working the area for a half hour or so. The report was not encouraging and after only 5 minutes, Billy wasn’t feeling it and made the call to move on. On the camera boat, we had just finished working out the kinks after the long bone jarring ride and were not thrilled when we got the call that it was another 27 miles to the next spot. So we locked down the gear and settled back in for another 45 minute run.

the stena forth. nikon d300s, 16mm, f/5.0, 1/1600 sec

the stena forth. nikon d300s, 16mm, f/5.0, 1/1600 sec

Finally, we arrived at our fishing location, the Stena Forth, a huge mobile exploratory drilling ship that had been testing the bottom for oil in 5000 feet of water for over a year in this spot. Almost immediately, we started marking bait and fish on the Simrad and the first few handfuls of freebies tossed out the stern led to impressive surface explosions. Baits were quickly dropped back and it didn’t take long for a nice double of Yellowfins to be hooked up. After 10-15 minutes Steve had brought his fish to the boat where it was gaffed, but Scott’s had a few more pounds on it and took a little longer. Eventually both fish were lifted on board and things were looking up. The double had taken us down current alongside the Stena Forth, so we idled back to our initial location off the Stern of the rig and started live chumming again.

doubled up on yellowfins on a yellowfin. nikon d800, 200mm, f/6.3, 1/640 sec

doubled up on yellowfins on a yellowfin. nikon d800, 200mm, f/6.3, 1/640 sec

that's a lot of sushi! nikon d800, 98mm, f/5.0, 1/2000 sec

that's a lot of sushi! nikon d800, 98mm, f/5.0, 1/2000 sec

This time Billy and Scott dropped baits back and Steve started hucking a new topwater Orca plug they had received from Shimano. Billy was first, making quick work of a nice tuna, even though he said he hadn’t had the chance to actually fight one himself in a long time. After that Scott and Billy doubled up, while Steve continued to throw the topwater plug hoping for the big explosion. Once both Billy and Scott’s fish were landed they heading back to the spot and everybody started throwing topwater. This time Steve and Scott doubled up on top, but Steve’s fish was a bonita and came in quickly. 

Billy and Steve lift scott's topwater fish on board.nikon d800, 200mm, f/5.0, 1/5000 sec

Billy and Steve lift scott's topwater fish on board.nikon d800, 200mm, f/5.0, 1/5000 sec

steve's topwater fish finishes off the day. nikon d800, 190mm, f/6.3, 1/2500 sec

steve's topwater fish finishes off the day. nikon d800, 190mm, f/6.3, 1/2500 sec

Eventually Scott got his topwater fish to the boat and Steve gaffed it and they put it quickly on ice with the others. It was starting to get a little late in the afternoon and as promised, the winds and waves were picking up. We decided to pull back up to the spot one more time and toss out the rest of the freebies for one more try. As before the live chum led to big blow ups a ways behind the boat. Steve continued to bomb them with the Orca plug and was finally rewarded with the big bite he had been looking for. Once more we drifted down with the fight alongside the Stena Forth and Scott stuck the big fish as Steve worked it to the boat. As they pulled it aboard you could just see the tip of the plug sticking out of its mouth. With that last fish we called it a day, with a long bumpy ride home and a lot of tuna to clean back at the docks. 

the start of a long bumpy ride home. nikon d800, 135mm, f/4.5, 1/1250 sec

the start of a long bumpy ride home. nikon d800, 135mm, f/4.5, 1/1250 sec

Yellowfin Yachts Releases their Brand New 24 Carbon Elite Series

Yellowfin Yachts Releases their Brand New 24 Carbon Elite Series   

Sarasota, Fla. Yellowfin Yachts, Inc. is pleased to announce the all new Carbon Elite Series. Based on the popular 24 Bay hull platform, the 24CE will incorporate a new laminate schedule, deck layout and console providing more space inside the interior cockpit.

  “The uniqueness is what you’ll find beneath the gel coat,” says Heath Daughtry, Vice President. “There have been plenty of companies in the past and currently that use the words “Kevlar” and “Carbon Fiber”. I believe we are the first to properly apply this advanced technology. The boat will be constructed with a Carbon / Kevlar blend. We have taken some of the most complex material in the industry and developed a laminate schedule that is over 20% lighter and 17% stronger than our current inshore line of products.”

    The new deck will include a forward step creating easier access to the foredeck. Beneath the step is a 290+ quart cooler spanning 68” across allowing storage for most nearshore pelagic species. The inner liner under the forward deck has also been enhanced with three separate chambers for storage. Trolling motor batteries will be stored below the floor of the center storage area as in our current model. The port and starboard side compartments are designed for fly rod storage and 8’ spinning rods. There is also plenty of room for additional items.

    The newly designed console will accept two 12” monitors on the dash and will incorporate a footrest.  A forward door gives way to a large opening with inside storage. Rod holders located on port and starboard will carry 8 rods vertically and safely.

   With the bay boat market becoming more saturated by the day, we will continue to maintain the distinct separation of our product from the rest of the field. This dedication has kept Yellowfin at the forefront of technology and design.

  “I’m extremely proud of our team of professionals that have been working on this innovative project.”

   We will be debuting this new model in February at the Miami Boat show booth #3176.  For more information please contact Heath Daughtry @ (941)753-7828 or YFY.Heath@gmail.com